benchmark

  • ODROID-X Continues Battling The PandaBoard ES

    Linux on ARMHere's the latest benchmarks of the low-cost ODROID-X, a $129 quad-core ARM Cortex-A9 development board out of Korea with ARM Mali 400 graphics. For just $129 USD, the ODROID-X development board is very interesting with packing Samsung's quad-core Exynos 4412 ARM Cortex-A9 processors running at 1.4GHz per core, Mali-400 MP Core graphics, six USB 2.0 ports, 10/100 Ethernet, and support for running Android and/or Ubuntu/Linaro.

  • The ARM Cortex-A9 Can Beat Out The Intel Atom

    Linux on ARMHere's some interesting test results recently uploaded to OpenBenchmarking.org that compares the performance of ARM Cortex A8 and Cortex A9 cores running at 1.0GHz against an Intel Atom N450. All three systems running at 1.0GHz were also running Gentoo Linux. Clock-for-clock, can the latest-generation ARM Cortex-A9 take out the Intel Atom? For the most part, yes.

  • Linaro 12.08 ARM OMAP4 Performance

    Linux on ARMThe Linaro organization offers monthly builds of Android and Ubuntu for their member SoC vendors, but are these Linaro-optimized Ubuntu builds any faster than the normal Ubuntu for ARM images? Here are some benchmarks of Linaro 12.08 compared to recent upstream Ubuntu Linux releases.

  • Quad-Core ODROID-X Tested Against PlayStation 3

    Linux on ARMHere are some more benchmarks of the ODROID-X, a $129 ARMv7 development board that packs four Cortex-A9 cores along with Mali-400 graphics to provide a fairly impressive punch. There's even some comparative numbers to a Sony PlayStation 3 running Linux.

  • Linux 3.5 On The TI OMAP4 PandaBoard ES

    Linux on ARMThe Linux 3.5 kernel for Texas Instruments OMAP4 devices has finally been uploaded into the Quantal repository for Ubuntu 12.10. With the upgraded kernel release, here are some new benchmarks of the popular PandaBoard ES compared to earlier Ubuntu 12.10 development snapshots, Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 11.10 from the dual-core Cortex-A9 ARMv7 development hardware.

  • ARM Calxeda Highbank Ubuntu Linux Benchmarks

    Linux on ARMBack in June there were Calxeda's ARM Highbank performance claims of delivering 15x performance-per-Watt superior performance to Intel's Xeon x86 processor. At long last, independent benchmarks of a quad-core Calxeda Highbank board are beginning to surface.

  • ARM Wrestling: Fedora 17 vs. Ubuntu Linux

    Linux on ARMWhen it comes to operating systems for the TI OMAP4 PandaBoard and PandaBoard ES, Ubuntu Linux is usually the winner for several reasons. However, with last month's release of Fedora 17 for ARM, how is the Red Hat sponsored distribution running on these ARM development boards? 

  • Building A 96-Core Ubuntu ARM Solar-Powered Cluster

    Linux on ARMLast week I shared results from the Phoronix 12-core ARM Linux mini cluster that was constructed out of six PandaBoard ES development boards. Over the weekend, a 96-core ARM cluster succeeded this build. While packing nearly 100 cores and running Ubuntu Linux, the power consumption was just a bit more than 200 Watts. This array of nearly 100 processor cores was even powered up by a solar panel.

  • 12-Core ARM Cluster Benchmarked Against Intel Atom, Ivy Bridge, AMD Fusion

    Linux on ARMLast week I shared my plans to build a low-cost, 12-core, 30-watt ARMv7 cluster running Ubuntu Linux. The ARM cluster that is built around the PandaBoard ES development boards is now online and producing results... Quite surprising results actually for a low-power Cortex-A9 compute cluster. Results include performance-per-Watt comparisons to Intel Atom and Ivy Bridge processors along with AMD's Fusion APU.

  • Clang Compiling Against GCC On Ubuntu ARM Linux

    Linux on ARMHere's an update on the LLVM/Clang vs. GCC compiler benchmarking on ARM hardware under Linux. Last month on Phoronix I shared a few basic benchmarks of GCC vs. LLVM/Clang Compilers On ARMv7 Linux. GCC 4.6.3 on Ubuntu 12.04 was doing much better than LLVM/Clang 3.0 from the Precise repository.

  • Ubuntu 12.10 Sets To Make ARM Even Stronger

    Linux on ARMWhile Ubuntu 12.04 already did a very good job at enhancing the ARM performance, Ubuntu 12.10 already has a number of performance improvements for ARM devices. With Ubuntu 12.04 for ARM there were performance improvements thanks to switching to ARM hardfp binaries by default rather than the soft floating-point version.

  • GCC vs. LLVM/Clang Compilers On ARMv7 Linux

    Linux on ARMWhile comparing compiler performance of different Linux code compilers on different software stacks and hardware configurations is nothing new at all to Phoronix, usually it's done on x86 hardware. However, with ARM hardware becoming increasingly common and much more powerful, here's a comparison of the GCC and LLVM/Clang compilers on a dual-core ARM development board.

  • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS ARMv7 Linux Performance Gains

    Linux on ARMEarlier in the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS "Precise Pangolin" development cycle I noted some performance improvements happening on the ARM side, particularly for Texas Instruments OMAP4. Namely, Ubuntu 12.04 was ARMing up for better performance with ARM hard-float support and the performance becoming more compelling for the PandaBoard ES hardware with proper cpufreq support. In this article is a comparison of the Ubuntu 11.10 and Ubuntu 12.04 ARM performance.

  • Raspberry Pi review

    Linux on ARMIt's been the most highly anticipated launch in the history of development boards, but one of the most problem-ridden too. Originally unveiled early last year with a suggested launch schedule of September 2011, the Raspberry Pi single-board computer has proven a beast to get out of the door - but the first retail models are finally landing in customers' hands this week.

  • Take Two: Comparing JVMs on ARM/Linux

    Linux on ARMAlthough the intent of the previous article, entitled Comparing JVMs on ARM/Linux, was to introduce and highlight the availability of the HotSpot server compiler (referred to as c2) for Java SE-Embedded ARM v7,  it seems, based on feedback, that everyone was more interested in the OpenJDK comparisons to Java SE-E.  But there were two main concerns:

  • NVIDIA Tegra 3 Makes For Fast Ubuntu On ARM

    Linux on ARMHere are the first set of Phoronix.com benchmarks of the quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3. Needless to say, four Cortex-A9s combined with NVIDIA graphics leads to a fairly fast ARMv7 experience when running Ubuntu Linux.

  • Linux on ARM: xz kernel decompression benchmarks

    Linux on ARMI recently managed to find time to clean up and submit my patches for xz kernel compression support on ARM, which I started working on back in November, during my flight to Linaro Connect. However, it was too late as Russell King, the ARM Linux maintainer, already accepted a similar patch, about 3 weeks before my submission. The lesson I learned was that checking a git tree is not always sufficient. I should have checked the mailing list archives too.

  • ARM On Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Battling Intel x86?

    Linux on ARMIn recent weeks I have shown how Ubuntu 12.04 is ARM-ing up for better performance on the ARMv7 architecture by enabling hard-float builds and how the TI OMAP4 support has come together resulting in significant performance gains. Nevertheless, how is modern ARM hardware now comparing to the low-end Intel x86 competition? In this article are some results from Ubuntu 12.04 comparing the ARM performance to some Intel Core, Pentium, and Atom hardware.

  • Comparing JVMs on ARM/Linux

    Linux on ARMFor quite some time, Java Standard Edition releases have included both client and server bytecode compilers (referred to as c1 and c2 respectively), whereas Java SE-Embedded binaries only contained the client c1 compiler. The rationale for excluding c2 stems from the fact that (1) eliminating optional components saves space, where in the embedded world, space is at a premium, and (2) embedded platforms were not given serious consideration for handling server-like workloads.

  • Ubuntu 12.04 ARM Performance Becomes Very Compelling

    Linux on ARMLast week I delivered benchmarks showing how Ubuntu 12.04 is ARM-ing up for better performance with ARM-based hardware and detailed some of the plans Canonical has for this architecture going forward. 


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Linux on ARM