Linux ARM and Intel

  • Linux Benchmarks – Intel J3455 Apollo Lake vs Z3735F Bay Trail vs RK3399 and Other ARM Platforms

    Linux on ARMSince I’ve just installed Ubuntu 17.10 on MeLE PCG35 Apo, I decided I should also run some benchmarks comparing with other ARM and x86 Linux platforms I’ve tested in the past.

  • AMD Launches 3 ARM based Opteron A1100 Server SoCs: A1120, A1150 and A1170

    Linux on ARMAMD Roadmap showed “Seattle” Cortex A57 server SoC were expected in H2 2014, which later became known as Opteron A1100, and the company unveiled their Optron A1100 development board in summer 2014, but since then there has been a few delays, the announcement of Huskyboard 96Boards EE development board, and finally they announced availability of three Opteron A1100 processors yesterday.

  • Performance-Per-Watt & How The Raspberry Pi 2 + Pi Zero Compare To Old NetBurst CPUs

    Linux on ARMAfter starting to run some Raspberry Pi Zero benchmarks this weekend, I'm back today with more benchmarks. In this article is also an interesting comparison showing the performance of the Raspberry Pi Zero and Raspberry Pi 2 against old "Northwood" Pentium 4 and Celeron processors from the Socket 478 NetBurst days. The many results in this article also include power consumption and performance-per-Watt metrics for this $5 ARM single board computer.

  • Intel Xeon D SoC To Wrestle ARM In Microserver And Cloud Services Markets

    Linux on ARMIntel's aiming to bring big core performance and intelligence in a microserver form factor with its new Xeon D family of processors, the company's first ever Xeon-based System-on-Chip (SoC). That sound you hear may be ARM's pulse skipping a beat, as Intel jams a mighty intimidating wrench into the rival chip maker's plans to dominate the microserver market.

  • Antutu Benchmark – Rockchip RK3288 (ARM) vs Intel Atom Z3735F

    Linux on ARMMost ARM mini PCs run Android, while mini PCs based on Intel Atom Z3735F currently all ship with Windows 8.1, so it makes comparison difficult. But since Linuxium posted triple boot instructions (Ubuntu, Android, Windows 10) for MeegoPad T01, he’s also run Antutu 5.6 on the platform, so we’ve got a comparison point.

  • AppliedMicro X-Gene ARM Server Software Status and Performance

    Linux on ARMIn this video, AppliedMicro’s Kumar Sankaran discusses the software of the X-Gene platform and provides a comparison of X-Gene 1 and 2 against the latest Intel server processors Xeon E5.

  • Linux Benchmarks – Rockchip RK3288 vs Exynos 5422 vs AllWinner A80 vs Intel Atom Z3735F

    Linux on ARMWith all these Intel Atom Z3735F been released right now at a price similar to ARM based mini PCs, many people, including myself, are wondering about the performance of the low cost Intel processor against their ARM competitors.

  • Applied Micro X-Gene (64-bit ARM) vs Intel Xeon (64-bit x86) Performance and Power Usage

    Linux on ARMA group of researcher at CERN have evaluated Applied Micro X-Gene 1 64-bit ARM XC-1 development board against Intel Xeon E5-2650 and Xeon Phi SE10/7120 systems, and one of them, David Abdurachmanov, presented their findings at ACAT’ 14 conference (Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques) by listing some of the issues they had to port their software to 64-bit ARM, and performance efficiency of the three systems for data processing of High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments like those at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where performance-per-watt is important, as computing systems may scale to several hundred thousands cores.

  • Why ARM Servers, And Why Now?

    how-toIt is a pity that smartphones and tablets did not come along earlier and did not need 64-bit processing and memory addressing sooner than they did. Had these consumer devices (which are now generally thought of as being indispensable for business as well) required such rich circuitry earlier, then the collective of chip manufacturers who are part of the ARM collective might have put some server-class chips into the field a lot earlier and given datacenters some real alternatives to the X86 architecture by now.

  • Freescale's i.MX6 SoC Smacks The Old Intel Atom Z530

    Linux on ARMFor the past few weeks I've had the pleasure of playing with CompuLab's Utilite Computer. The Utilite is a miniature ARM desktop computer powered by Freescale's i.MX6 SoC and is running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. This is a speedy little Linux system that for some workloads can blow past Intel's original Atom Z530 "Poulsbo" SoC system.

  • ARM vs. Intel: What It Means for Windows, Chromebook, and Android Software Compatibility

    Linux on ARMIntel x86 or x64 processors have traditionally been found in laptops and desktops, while ARM processors have been found in lower-power embedded devices, smartphones, and tablets. But you can now buy laptops with ARM chips and smartphones with Intel chips.

  • ODROID-XU's ARM big.LITTLE A7 + A15 Octa-Core

    Linux on ARMThe ODROID-XU is the latest exciting ARM development board. Rather than aiming for low-cost like the Raspberry Pi, the ODROID-XU currently offers maximum performance when it comes to open ARM development boards.

  • Microservers: How ARM can challenge Intel by befriending Facebook

    Linux on ARMIn the server space Intel is undisputedly king, with its chips inside more than nine in 10 servers shipped. But as the microserver market grows, so does the potential area of opportunity for UK chip designer ARM, which hopes to exploit its expertise in creating low-power chips for mobile devices.

  • Unpleasant: LLVM/Clang 3.2 On The ARM Cortex-A15

    Linux on ARMSince publishing LLVM/Clang 3.2 benchmarks a few days ago that showed the Clang C/C++ compiler competing with -- and in some cases outperforming -- the GCC compiler on Intel x86_64, several Phoronix readers have been asking how things compare on the ARM side.

  • ARM Cortex-A15 vs. NVIDIA Tegra 3 vs. Intel x86

    Linux on ARMLast week I shared some early benchmarks of the Samsung Chromebook while running Ubuntu Linux. The Samsung Chromebook is very interesting since it's one of the few readily available computers on the market employing an ARM Cortex-A15 processor rather than Cortex-A9 or other models.

  • Calxeda ECX-1000 Benchmarks vs. Intel Atom, TI OMAP4

    Linux on ARMLast week I began delivering benchmarks of the low-power yet massively scalable Calxeda EnergyCore ECX-1000 ARM Server and followed the initial tests with some ARM compiler benchmarks and other benchmarks from this 5-Watt Linux Server.

  • 12-Core ARM Cluster Benchmarked Against Intel Atom, Ivy Bridge, AMD Fusion

    Linux on ARMLast week I shared my plans to build a low-cost, 12-core, 30-watt ARMv7 cluster running Ubuntu Linux. The ARM cluster that is built around the PandaBoard ES development boards is now online and producing results... Quite surprising results actually for a low-power Cortex-A9 compute cluster. Results include performance-per-Watt comparisons to Intel Atom and Ivy Bridge processors along with AMD's Fusion APU.

  • ThinkPad X1 Hybrid packs both x86 and ARM processors

    Linux on ARMLenovo has announced a 13.3-inch notebook computer that has both Intel and ARM processors. The ThinkPad X1 Hybrid combines an Core i3, i5, or i7 CPU with a dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon, allowing users to toggle between Windows 7 and a Linux-based "Instant Media Mode" operating system whenever they want.

  • The End of the x86 Era

    Linux on ARMIntel's dominance in the world of microprocessors remains unabated and should persevere for the next decade despite stiff competition from AMD, ARM, and potentially some new players. The demise is in mind share, especially with the whole idea about microprocessors and the x86.

  • Mad Dog 21/21: ARMs To Fare Well

    Linux on ARMSteve Jobs was such a captivating promoter of inventions that his products reshaped our thinking, defining or redefining products we once thought we fully understood. At his best, Jobs was almost too good. If Picasso were God all fish would be flounders. But the computer industry, like nature, fosters diversity. Apple's smart clients, the iPhone and iPad, are iconic devices built around systems-on-a-chip (SoCs), but they are not the only important applications of this technology. Servers, too, can be made from compact, efficient, and inexpensive SoCs. And they will prove to be exceedingly disruptive.


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Linux on ARM